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Articles

Amartithi
  – Bruce Felknor

"You'll find Me in the garden"
  – Jenny Keating

'Heart Tires of Its Gaudy Dress' – Francis Brabazon
  – Buck Busfield

HOLLYWOOD
  – Billy Goodrum

Trust and Intimacy
  – Jenny Keating

Living with Baba
  – Bruce Felknor

When Words Fail . . . Just Use More Words
  – Buck Busfield

Suffering and Service
  – Juniper Lesnik

SPOILER ALERT
  – Billy Goodrum

The charm of His ways. . .
  – Jenny Keating

The Importance of Being Furnished
  – Bruce Felknor

It's Been Fun
  – Steve Klein

Let’s Talk about Love
  – Juniper Lesnik

Cannes
  – Billy Goodrum

In the world but not of it . . .
  – Jenny Keating

Give Me Your Imperfections
  – Wendy Connor

Children of the One God
  – Bruce Felknor

As the Poet Says
  – Steve Klein

Happy Endings
  – Jenny Keating

Thoughts on Furniture
  – Billy Goodrum

Going Home
  – Juniper Lesnik

A Tale of Two Connections
  – Bruce Felknor

The Flowering Seed
  – Wendy Connor

Baby Steps
  – Steve Klein

Patience
  – Jenny Keating

Hold On!
  – Juniper Lesnik

Waiting for the New Humanity
  – Billy Goodrum

Remembering
  – Bruce Felknor

The Beloved's Beloved
  – Wendy Connor

Compare and Contrast
  – Steve Klein

It's in the struggle . . .
  – Jenny Keating

Time
  – Juniper Lesnik

The Tipping Point
  – Billy Goodrum

Learning Poise
  – Bruce Felknor

When "Good Enough" Isn't
  – Steve Klein

Conflict and Joy
  – Jenny Keating

Sleepless in San Jose
  – Juniper Lesnik

Vacation Incarnation
  – Steve Klein

Nerve Endings of the Soul
  – Jenny Keating

"Let the World Wait"
  – Wendy Connor

Religion vs Spirituality
  – Steve Klein

The Bigger Challenge
  – Wendy Connor

Que Sera Sera
  – Steve Klein

To Be Honest
  – Juniper Lesnik

Praise and Blame
  – Steve Klein

Being Right
  – Steve Klein

To Love God is To Love Our Fellow Beings
  – Juniper Lesnik

God is Alive in the World
  – Wendy Connor

Determined to Be His
  – Steve Klein

The Stuff We're Made Of
  – Juniper Lesnik

"I Will Always Be With You": Memories of the East West Gathering
  – Wendy Connor

Half Full or Half Empty?
  – Steve Klein

Love The One You're With
  – Steve Klein

Ordinary Life
  – Juniper Lesnik

Baba Loved Us Too
  – Wendy Connor

Feeling His Love
  – Steve Klein

He is both Father and Mother
  – Juniper Lesnik

A Leap of Faith
  – Wendy Connor

Becoming His
  – Steve Klein

Don't Worry, Be Happy
  – Juniper Lesnik

A Life Worth Living
  – Wendy Connor

Love The One You're With
  – Steve Klein

What a Mighty Beloved our Beloved is
  – Wendy Connor

To thine own self be true?
  – Steve Klein

The Sweets of His Love
  – Wendy Connor

Sickness and Health
  – Juniper Lesnik

Giving Advice
  – Steve Klein

"Garlic-Faced"
  – Wendy Connor

To Love and Be Loved
  – Juniper Lesnik

Talking About The Truth
  – Steve Klein

The Script was Written Long Ago
  – Wendy Connor

Excuse Me, Which Way to God?
  – Steve Klein

Letting Go
  – Juniper Lesnik

The Mosquitoes are Bad Today
  – Wendy Connor

What If A Teaching Moment Never Comes?
  – Steve Klein

Beads On One String
  – Juniper Lesnik

Youth Sahavas '07
  – Wendy Connor

Stop, You're Both Right!
  – Steve Klein

God, Please Give me a Job
  – Juniper Lesnik

"It Just Passes More Quickly"
  – Wendy Connor

Multiple Meher Babas
  – Steve Klein

Winking Back
  – Juniper Lesnik

The Treasure Within
  – Wendy Connor

Holding On, But Losing One's Grip
  – Steve Klein

1969
  – Ann Conlon

Obedience
  – Ann Conlon

Meher Center – The Way It Was
  – Ann Conlon

Armageddon, Anyone?
  – Ann Conlon

What Does Baba Want Me to Do?
  – Ann Conlon

Baba's 'Things'
  – Ann Conlon

What Does THAT Mean?
  – Ann Conlon

The Way It Was – Meherabad
  – Ann Conlon

Doing "Baba Work"
  – Ann Conlon

Broken Heads
  – Ann Conlon

Enid
  – Ann Conlon

On Being Ill
  – Ann Conlon

Meherjee
  – Ann Conlon

To Each His Own
  – Ann Conlon

Youth Sahavas
  – Ann Conlon

Kitty
  – Ann Conlon

The Lonely Path
  – Ann Conlon

Isn't He Enough?
  – Ann Conlon

He Said What?
  – Ann Conlon

Goher
  – Ann Conlon

Taking a Dare
  – Ann Conlon

Seeking Suffering
  – Ann Conlon

Amartithi
  – Ann Conlon

Dreams
  – Ann Conlon

Margaret
  – Ann Conlon

"The Disciple"
  – Ann Conlon

I Wonder ...
  – Ann Conlon

Backbiting, etc.
  – Ann Conlon

Hearing His Name
  – Ann Conlon

Rites, Rituals and Ceremonies
  – Ann Conlon

His Promise
  – Ann Conlon

"Baba's Group"
  – Ann Conlon

Then and Now
  – Ann Conlon

Middlemen Revisited
  – Ann Conlon

Padri
  – Ann Conlon

Gateway Days
  – Ann Conlon

The New Life
  – Ann Conlon

Books, Books and More Books
  – Ann Conlon

Elizabeth Patterson
  – Ann Conlon

His "Last Warning"
  – Ann Conlon

Is That A Religion Coming?
  – Ann Conlon

Detachment
  – Ann Conlon

A Country of Our Own?
  – Ann Conlon

Manifestation: Did He Or Didn't He?
  – Ann Conlon

Remembering Mohammed
  – Ann Conlon

Advice (Sort-Of) for Newcomers
  – Ann Conlon

You're a Baba Lover If...
  – Ann Conlon

Real Happiness
  – Ann Conlon

Baba Lover, Baba Follower or Both?
  – Ann Conlon

Meherazad – The Way It Was
  – Ann Conlon

The Strongest Memories
  – Ann Conlon

All (Baba) Things Considered

Meher Center – The Way It Was

I first came to the Meher Spiritual Center with a friend in the summer of 1958, a few weeks after Meher Baba had left.

At the time, in order to enter, you called Elizabeth Patterson for reservations and when you got within a few miles on the day of your arrival, you called again. And Elizabeth and Kitty drove up to the gate from their home, Youpon Dunes, in Myrtle Beach. There was no Gateway, so the guest book and the keys were kept at Pine Lodge. We learned the rules verbally from Elizabeth: wear closed shoes; don't go to the beach alone; carry a flashlight at night. And an extra suggestion for me, with my Irish-fair skin: "You'd better get your tan by the light of the moon."

There was no one else there at the time; there were no programs, no guided tours, no maps, no film nights and no guest speakers. There was only one staff person — the night watchman Frank Eaton. And there was Kitty, who by Baba's order had to sleep at the Center each night when a new person (in this case, me) was there.

There was one thing that hasn't changed over more than forty years: Meher Baba's presence. It is as strong and as sweet now as it was then. He has certainly kept the promise he made all those years ago, "I never come and I never go." And there are times when the sense of his presence is so powerful that one expects him to come striding along a path at any moment.

In 1958, the Center was truly a place for "rest, meditation and renewal of the spiritual life." No distractions, certainly. The days were quiet, peaceful, with hours spent on the beach, in the Barn and the Lagoon Cabin.

Each evening, Kitty let us know that she had arrived and we joined her on the Lake Cabin porch. She asked about our lives and talked about Baba, we watched the moon come up over Long Lake, and listened to the tree frogs every evening for a week. Years later, one stood in line on the Dilruba porch to have a few minutes with Kitty.

There was lunch one day with Elizabeth and Kitty and I asked Elizabeth to tell me about meeting Baba. She became flustered and said she couldn't just tell it with no warning. I dropped the subject in a hurry and instead asked what it was like to go to the North Pole, which she had done aboard a Russian icebreaker. In answering, she gave me her Baba story in one sentence: "It was the purest thing I ever saw until I met Meher Baba."

The Center itself was neat and beautifully kept, even though there was no grounds crew. Elizabeth simply hired workers as needed. Kitty frequently came out in the daytime, once spending hours on her knees planting plugs of grass in the circle outside the Original Kitchen. She also cleaned the cabins, even though we all cleaned up our own cabins before we left.

The library was in Pine Lodge and Baba meetings were also held there. A few years later what films there were of Baba were shown in the screened area off the Original Kitchen, now the Lakeview Kitchen. Baba's House was only open on Sundays, and Kitty served as the tour guide. One Sunday, she was showing the house to a small group of first time visitors when she pointed out the portrait of Baba in the living room and said, "That's how he looked when I first met him." The joy and love on her face at that moment are indescribable.

Of course, I sometimes miss the Center the way it was. On the other hand I know Meher Baba didn't create it for the less-than-a-handful of people who came in those early years. He made it for all "those who love and follow me and for those who know of me and want to know more." The numbers of people have grown, the number of buildings has grown, and so have the staff and the cadre of volunteers. And I have every confidence in Baba's promise that "the Center will be a place of pilgrimage for a thousand years," So we all better take very good care of it, seeing to it that it continues to be his much-loved "home in the West."