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Articles

Amartithi
  – Bruce Felknor

"You'll find Me in the garden"
  – Jenny Keating

'Heart Tires of Its Gaudy Dress' – Francis Brabazon
  – Buck Busfield

HOLLYWOOD
  – Billy Goodrum

Trust and Intimacy
  – Jenny Keating

Living with Baba
  – Bruce Felknor

When Words Fail . . . Just Use More Words
  – Buck Busfield

Suffering and Service
  – Juniper Lesnik

SPOILER ALERT
  – Billy Goodrum

The charm of His ways. . .
  – Jenny Keating

The Importance of Being Furnished
  – Bruce Felknor

It's Been Fun
  – Steve Klein

Let’s Talk about Love
  – Juniper Lesnik

Cannes
  – Billy Goodrum

In the world but not of it . . .
  – Jenny Keating

Give Me Your Imperfections
  – Wendy Connor

Children of the One God
  – Bruce Felknor

As the Poet Says
  – Steve Klein

Happy Endings
  – Jenny Keating

Thoughts on Furniture
  – Billy Goodrum

Going Home
  – Juniper Lesnik

A Tale of Two Connections
  – Bruce Felknor

The Flowering Seed
  – Wendy Connor

Baby Steps
  – Steve Klein

Patience
  – Jenny Keating

Hold On!
  – Juniper Lesnik

Waiting for the New Humanity
  – Billy Goodrum

Remembering
  – Bruce Felknor

The Beloved's Beloved
  – Wendy Connor

Compare and Contrast
  – Steve Klein

It's in the struggle . . .
  – Jenny Keating

Time
  – Juniper Lesnik

The Tipping Point
  – Billy Goodrum

Learning Poise
  – Bruce Felknor

When "Good Enough" Isn't
  – Steve Klein

Conflict and Joy
  – Jenny Keating

Sleepless in San Jose
  – Juniper Lesnik

Vacation Incarnation
  – Steve Klein

Nerve Endings of the Soul
  – Jenny Keating

"Let the World Wait"
  – Wendy Connor

Religion vs Spirituality
  – Steve Klein

The Bigger Challenge
  – Wendy Connor

Que Sera Sera
  – Steve Klein

To Be Honest
  – Juniper Lesnik

Praise and Blame
  – Steve Klein

Being Right
  – Steve Klein

To Love God is To Love Our Fellow Beings
  – Juniper Lesnik

God is Alive in the World
  – Wendy Connor

Determined to Be His
  – Steve Klein

The Stuff We're Made Of
  – Juniper Lesnik

"I Will Always Be With You": Memories of the East West Gathering
  – Wendy Connor

Half Full or Half Empty?
  – Steve Klein

Love The One You're With
  – Steve Klein

Ordinary Life
  – Juniper Lesnik

Baba Loved Us Too
  – Wendy Connor

Feeling His Love
  – Steve Klein

He is both Father and Mother
  – Juniper Lesnik

A Leap of Faith
  – Wendy Connor

Becoming His
  – Steve Klein

Don't Worry, Be Happy
  – Juniper Lesnik

A Life Worth Living
  – Wendy Connor

Love The One You're With
  – Steve Klein

What a Mighty Beloved our Beloved is
  – Wendy Connor

To thine own self be true?
  – Steve Klein

The Sweets of His Love
  – Wendy Connor

Sickness and Health
  – Juniper Lesnik

Giving Advice
  – Steve Klein

"Garlic-Faced"
  – Wendy Connor

To Love and Be Loved
  – Juniper Lesnik

Talking About The Truth
  – Steve Klein

The Script was Written Long Ago
  – Wendy Connor

Excuse Me, Which Way to God?
  – Steve Klein

Letting Go
  – Juniper Lesnik

The Mosquitoes are Bad Today
  – Wendy Connor

What If A Teaching Moment Never Comes?
  – Steve Klein

Beads On One String
  – Juniper Lesnik

Youth Sahavas '07
  – Wendy Connor

Stop, You're Both Right!
  – Steve Klein

God, Please Give me a Job
  – Juniper Lesnik

"It Just Passes More Quickly"
  – Wendy Connor

Multiple Meher Babas
  – Steve Klein

Winking Back
  – Juniper Lesnik

The Treasure Within
  – Wendy Connor

Holding On, But Losing One's Grip
  – Steve Klein

1969
  – Ann Conlon

Obedience
  – Ann Conlon

Meher Center – The Way It Was
  – Ann Conlon

Armageddon, Anyone?
  – Ann Conlon

What Does Baba Want Me to Do?
  – Ann Conlon

Baba's 'Things'
  – Ann Conlon

What Does THAT Mean?
  – Ann Conlon

The Way It Was – Meherabad
  – Ann Conlon

Doing "Baba Work"
  – Ann Conlon

Broken Heads
  – Ann Conlon

Enid
  – Ann Conlon

On Being Ill
  – Ann Conlon

Meherjee
  – Ann Conlon

To Each His Own
  – Ann Conlon

Youth Sahavas
  – Ann Conlon

Kitty
  – Ann Conlon

The Lonely Path
  – Ann Conlon

Isn't He Enough?
  – Ann Conlon

He Said What?
  – Ann Conlon

Goher
  – Ann Conlon

Taking a Dare
  – Ann Conlon

Seeking Suffering
  – Ann Conlon

Amartithi
  – Ann Conlon

Dreams
  – Ann Conlon

Margaret
  – Ann Conlon

"The Disciple"
  – Ann Conlon

I Wonder ...
  – Ann Conlon

Backbiting, etc.
  – Ann Conlon

Hearing His Name
  – Ann Conlon

Rites, Rituals and Ceremonies
  – Ann Conlon

His Promise
  – Ann Conlon

"Baba's Group"
  – Ann Conlon

Then and Now
  – Ann Conlon

Middlemen Revisited
  – Ann Conlon

Padri
  – Ann Conlon

Gateway Days
  – Ann Conlon

The New Life
  – Ann Conlon

Books, Books and More Books
  – Ann Conlon

Elizabeth Patterson
  – Ann Conlon

His "Last Warning"
  – Ann Conlon

Is That A Religion Coming?
  – Ann Conlon

Detachment
  – Ann Conlon

A Country of Our Own?
  – Ann Conlon

Manifestation: Did He Or Didn't He?
  – Ann Conlon

Remembering Mohammed
  – Ann Conlon

Advice (Sort-Of) for Newcomers
  – Ann Conlon

You're a Baba Lover If...
  – Ann Conlon

Real Happiness
  – Ann Conlon

Baba Lover, Baba Follower or Both?
  – Ann Conlon

Meherazad – The Way It Was
  – Ann Conlon

The Strongest Memories
  – Ann Conlon

All (Baba) Things Considered

When Words Fail . . . Just Use More Words

I've always wanted to be a cool Baba Lover. The kind who can quote Baba at will, about any and every subject, and explain exactly what He meant. Yeah, that's what I want to be.

And I finally got my chance! Some friends asked if they could visit tomorrow, as they want to learn what Baba had to say about a variety of subjects.

Awesome! I'll fix a pot of tea, snacks, and really hold court. Tell them what Baba said about everything. Who knows, maybe do a little of His Universal Work? Ease his burden?

First I have to bone up on what Baba said. And it should be easy, right?  I mean how much did Baba say? He was silent after all.

"He actually said a lot."

"Who are you?"

"Doesn't matter. Using the publishing industry's average of 250 words per page, Baba wrote about 750,000 words (God Speaks, Discourses, The Everything and The Nothing, etc.)."

"Shakespeare wrote 884,647 words."

"Add in Baba's many public statements, such as the Universal Message, The Highest of the High, The Call, etc., his prayers, poems, songs, utterances, conversations, private orders, letters and cables, and we could reasonably calculate that Baba said about a million things."

"'A million things? No problem. Just have to study a little so when one of my guests asks 'what did Baba say about this?',  I'll have an answer. I mean how hard can it be?"

"Well, three times harder than you think. In his 1958 Clarification and Confirmation of the Final Declaration, Baba said He speaks in three languages."

"Baba spoke in three languages? Three? Like Gujarati, Hindi and English?"

"Nope. Baba said he spoke in three interpretive languages:
1)     in our wordly language, which we can understand
2)     in His Divine Language, which we can't understand
3)     and in both languages simultaneously, which, I presume if we're lucky we can only understand  half?

"Okay still not a problem. I'll just come up with three plausible interpretations of something Baba said, and pick one. Heck that's a 33.3% chance of getting it right. Pretty good odds. This'll be fun. Wonder what I should wear? I know, a nice Indian kurta!"

"Wait."

"Why wait?"

"Baba also said that in addition to the three possible interpretations of the one million words He spoke, He, as the Avatar, sometimes spoke from Infinite Knowledge and at other times from ordinary human unknowing."

"Baba spoke from ordinary human unknowing? Like you and me?"

"Yes, in other words, as a man, Baba sometimes simply didn't know. He wasn't fakin' it like a Perfect Master. He truly didn't know."

(Gulp.)

"Okay. So of the one million things Baba said, of which there may be three interpretations, a certain number of them may have been spoken . . . in ignorance?"

"Yep."

(Gulp again.)

"And there's more. Don't forget Baba often spoke in jest (will grapes really be extinct in 700 years?), used hyperbole (is eating eggplant tantamount to committing suicide?), and metaphorically (will three quarters of the world really be destroyed?)."

"Okay, stop. Stop! This is getting too complicated. A million things? Three languages? Some spoken in ignorance? Others using poetic device? There's not a snowball's chance in hell I can accurately explain Baba's words to my friends."

"There is actually less."

"Less than a snowball's chance in hell? Scientifically?"

"'No, metaphorically. Suppose you get lucky and interpret Baba's words accurately, there is still a reasonable chance they won't understand."

"But I'll be clear. Very clear."

"Doesn't matter. Humans have a unique way of transforming what they hear into what they think they hear."

"Which means. . . ?"

"Hearing is subjective."

"So regardless of my efforts, there is a good likelihood my guests will misunderstand? On their own?"

"Yep."

"I'm cancelling tea. Putting my kurta away. Too bad. I really wanted to be that guy. That Baba guy who can share Baba's words at the drop of a hat . . . and explain what they meant."

"Oh, you can still be that guy."

"Yeah?"

"Yeah. You just have to understand there is a good chance you'll be wrong or misunderstood."

"What chance?"

"Funny you should ask. Here."
 






















 "What's that?"

"It's the mathematical formula showing the number of possible interpretations of any one thing Baba said."

"How many is that?"

"1363."

"That's . . . a lot. An awful lot."

"It is."

"Then how should I reply when asked 'What did Baba say about this or that?'. I gotta say something. I can't just say 'I don't know' all evening. That's not very helpful."

"Just say what you feel about Baba."

"What I feel? About Baba?"

"Yes. And what do you feel?"

"Well, I think He's beautiful and I love him."

"Just say that."

"Just say I think He's beautiful and I love Him? That won't help anyone understand Him."

"Understanding is overrated."

"But?"

"Just say it. Baba will take it from there."

"Okay. Okay. Okay. I'll say it. Only because it's late and I'm tired and I need to get to Game of Thrones. I'll just say I think Baba's beautiful and I love Him. But after that, I'll be stuck with two hours of tea and small talk . . . but it is a lot easier than trying to explain everything."

"Incorrectly."

"Incorrectly. Thanks. Thanks a lot. You've been a big help."

"My pleasure."

"Oh, one last thing. If I just say I think Baba's beautiful and I love Him, what are the chances they'll understand?"

"About 18%."

". . . Jai Baba."

"And Jai Baba to you."

"Hey, do you want to join us for tea tomorrow?"

"No, I'm good."


Published October 2015.