843-272-1339

Articles

Amartithi
  – Bruce Felknor

"You'll find Me in the garden"
  – Jenny Keating

'Heart Tires of Its Gaudy Dress' – Francis Brabazon
  – Buck Busfield

HOLLYWOOD
  – Billy Goodrum

Trust and Intimacy
  – Jenny Keating

Living with Baba
  – Bruce Felknor

When Words Fail . . . Just Use More Words
  – Buck Busfield

Suffering and Service
  – Juniper Lesnik

SPOILER ALERT
  – Billy Goodrum

The charm of His ways. . .
  – Jenny Keating

The Importance of Being Furnished
  – Bruce Felknor

It's Been Fun
  – Steve Klein

Let’s Talk about Love
  – Juniper Lesnik

Cannes
  – Billy Goodrum

In the world but not of it . . .
  – Jenny Keating

Give Me Your Imperfections
  – Wendy Connor

Children of the One God
  – Bruce Felknor

As the Poet Says
  – Steve Klein

Happy Endings
  – Jenny Keating

Thoughts on Furniture
  – Billy Goodrum

Going Home
  – Juniper Lesnik

A Tale of Two Connections
  – Bruce Felknor

The Flowering Seed
  – Wendy Connor

Baby Steps
  – Steve Klein

Patience
  – Jenny Keating

Hold On!
  – Juniper Lesnik

Waiting for the New Humanity
  – Billy Goodrum

Remembering
  – Bruce Felknor

The Beloved's Beloved
  – Wendy Connor

Compare and Contrast
  – Steve Klein

It's in the struggle . . .
  – Jenny Keating

Time
  – Juniper Lesnik

The Tipping Point
  – Billy Goodrum

Learning Poise
  – Bruce Felknor

When "Good Enough" Isn't
  – Steve Klein

Conflict and Joy
  – Jenny Keating

Sleepless in San Jose
  – Juniper Lesnik

Vacation Incarnation
  – Steve Klein

Nerve Endings of the Soul
  – Jenny Keating

"Let the World Wait"
  – Wendy Connor

Religion vs Spirituality
  – Steve Klein

The Bigger Challenge
  – Wendy Connor

Que Sera Sera
  – Steve Klein

To Be Honest
  – Juniper Lesnik

Praise and Blame
  – Steve Klein

Being Right
  – Steve Klein

To Love God is To Love Our Fellow Beings
  – Juniper Lesnik

God is Alive in the World
  – Wendy Connor

Determined to Be His
  – Steve Klein

The Stuff We're Made Of
  – Juniper Lesnik

"I Will Always Be With You": Memories of the East West Gathering
  – Wendy Connor

Half Full or Half Empty?
  – Steve Klein

Love The One You're With
  – Steve Klein

Ordinary Life
  – Juniper Lesnik

Baba Loved Us Too
  – Wendy Connor

Feeling His Love
  – Steve Klein

He is both Father and Mother
  – Juniper Lesnik

A Leap of Faith
  – Wendy Connor

Becoming His
  – Steve Klein

Don't Worry, Be Happy
  – Juniper Lesnik

A Life Worth Living
  – Wendy Connor

Love The One You're With
  – Steve Klein

What a Mighty Beloved our Beloved is
  – Wendy Connor

To thine own self be true?
  – Steve Klein

The Sweets of His Love
  – Wendy Connor

Sickness and Health
  – Juniper Lesnik

Giving Advice
  – Steve Klein

"Garlic-Faced"
  – Wendy Connor

To Love and Be Loved
  – Juniper Lesnik

Talking About The Truth
  – Steve Klein

The Script was Written Long Ago
  – Wendy Connor

Excuse Me, Which Way to God?
  – Steve Klein

Letting Go
  – Juniper Lesnik

The Mosquitoes are Bad Today
  – Wendy Connor

What If A Teaching Moment Never Comes?
  – Steve Klein

Beads On One String
  – Juniper Lesnik

Youth Sahavas '07
  – Wendy Connor

Stop, You're Both Right!
  – Steve Klein

God, Please Give me a Job
  – Juniper Lesnik

"It Just Passes More Quickly"
  – Wendy Connor

Multiple Meher Babas
  – Steve Klein

Winking Back
  – Juniper Lesnik

The Treasure Within
  – Wendy Connor

Holding On, But Losing One's Grip
  – Steve Klein

1969
  – Ann Conlon

Obedience
  – Ann Conlon

Meher Center – The Way It Was
  – Ann Conlon

Armageddon, Anyone?
  – Ann Conlon

What Does Baba Want Me to Do?
  – Ann Conlon

Baba's 'Things'
  – Ann Conlon

What Does THAT Mean?
  – Ann Conlon

The Way It Was – Meherabad
  – Ann Conlon

Doing "Baba Work"
  – Ann Conlon

Broken Heads
  – Ann Conlon

Enid
  – Ann Conlon

On Being Ill
  – Ann Conlon

Meherjee
  – Ann Conlon

To Each His Own
  – Ann Conlon

Youth Sahavas
  – Ann Conlon

Kitty
  – Ann Conlon

The Lonely Path
  – Ann Conlon

Isn't He Enough?
  – Ann Conlon

He Said What?
  – Ann Conlon

Goher
  – Ann Conlon

Taking a Dare
  – Ann Conlon

Seeking Suffering
  – Ann Conlon

Amartithi
  – Ann Conlon

Dreams
  – Ann Conlon

Margaret
  – Ann Conlon

"The Disciple"
  – Ann Conlon

I Wonder ...
  – Ann Conlon

Backbiting, etc.
  – Ann Conlon

Hearing His Name
  – Ann Conlon

Rites, Rituals and Ceremonies
  – Ann Conlon

His Promise
  – Ann Conlon

"Baba's Group"
  – Ann Conlon

Then and Now
  – Ann Conlon

Middlemen Revisited
  – Ann Conlon

Padri
  – Ann Conlon

Gateway Days
  – Ann Conlon

The New Life
  – Ann Conlon

Books, Books and More Books
  – Ann Conlon

Elizabeth Patterson
  – Ann Conlon

His "Last Warning"
  – Ann Conlon

Is That A Religion Coming?
  – Ann Conlon

Detachment
  – Ann Conlon

A Country of Our Own?
  – Ann Conlon

Manifestation: Did He Or Didn't He?
  – Ann Conlon

Remembering Mohammed
  – Ann Conlon

Advice (Sort-Of) for Newcomers
  – Ann Conlon

You're a Baba Lover If...
  – Ann Conlon

Real Happiness
  – Ann Conlon

Baba Lover, Baba Follower or Both?
  – Ann Conlon

Meherazad – The Way It Was
  – Ann Conlon

The Strongest Memories
  – Ann Conlon

All (Baba) Things Considered

Baby Steps

This is a good news-bad news column. The good news is that whatever we can do for Baba – no matter how tiny or insignificant – is good. No matter how little we do, it's better than doing nothing.

I was once told a story that was attributed to Eruch (although I never heard Eruch tell this myself) about a man who was overcome with carnal desire. The man got married, but he found that this did not provide enough of an outlet for his overwhelming desires and so he took a mistress. This too was not enough, so he started visiting prostitutes. Even then, he found that his desire remained unsated, so he bought a goat.

After some period of time, he got rid of the goat. And the moral of the story was: “That too is progress.”

Although I am not sure of the authenticity of this story, it appeals to me. In fact now, when Daphne and I realize that once again we have fallen far short of the mark in the way we handled some situation – but just possibly could have done even worse – we will ruefully remind each other, “Well, that too is progress.”

That's the good news. The bad news is a mirror image of this. No sooner do you give up the goat and applaud yourself that, “this too is progress,” than your conscience whispers in your ear, “Now, about those prostitutes . . .”

Baba says there is no rest on this path; you can't go backwards and you can't stay where you are. Well, actually, if you're at all like me, there's mostly rest and staying in one place, but even I sometimes get the sense that it's time to get up and start moving on. Although resting seems (by definition) restful, eventually we realize that it's not getting us anywhere. And even if you aren't intent on getting anywhere, you won't be comfortable staying where you are. As Baba might say, the “very logic of experience” will eventually impel you forward.

For example, given my tendency to judge others, I thought it a great success when I was finally able, sometimes, to suppress my urge to comment when I saw people doing things I didn't approve of. But, over time, I came to see that Baba doesn't want this kind of passive neutrality. He wants me to express positive acceptance of others. This doesn't come easily for me, so it was a struggle to come up with even mildly laudatory comments and I was proud when I did so, only to find that Baba lost little time in letting me know that such tepid politeness isn't what He had in mind – He wants a wholehearted and genuine expression. I suspect if I can ever accomplish that, I'll find out there's some new refinement or challenge awaiting me. And so it goes.

Which is why, when people look back at some problematic situation they have been in and ask, “Did I do the right thing?” it's almost impossible to answer such a question. For, on the one hand, no matter what they did, they could have done worse. On the other hand, no matter what they did, they could have done better. So you end up with a Baba theory of relativity. “What you did was right for you, for where you were, at that point in time and space, but eventually, you will realize that you could do more.”

It's pointless to judge others. You may find that it's easy being faithful to your spouse. They may have made heroic efforts to be able to give up the goat. We all tread the same path. Where we happen to be at this moment is not as important as the amount of effort we are putting in to move forward. It's the spiritual equivalent of “What have you done for me lately?” Baba is not all that impressed with what you've achieved in the past; He's more interested in what you're doing right now. Which is why “that too is progress” is a good reminder to not judge others but doesn't work as well when it comes to our own efforts. It's not that we should beat ourselves up about our lack of progress, but we should be aware of being able to do more.

So, although I may continue to remind myself when I manage to minimally moderate some major failing that, “That too is progress,” I will try to remember to add an addendum, “but this is not where I want to be.” For I know, if I can let go of the past, in the very next instant, Baba will give me another opportunity to please Him.