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Articles

Amartithi
  – Bruce Felknor

"You'll find Me in the garden"
  – Jenny Keating

'Heart Tires of Its Gaudy Dress' – Francis Brabazon
  – Buck Busfield

HOLLYWOOD
  – Billy Goodrum

Trust and Intimacy
  – Jenny Keating

Living with Baba
  – Bruce Felknor

When Words Fail . . . Just Use More Words
  – Buck Busfield

Suffering and Service
  – Juniper Lesnik

SPOILER ALERT
  – Billy Goodrum

The charm of His ways. . .
  – Jenny Keating

The Importance of Being Furnished
  – Bruce Felknor

It's Been Fun
  – Steve Klein

Let’s Talk about Love
  – Juniper Lesnik

Cannes
  – Billy Goodrum

In the world but not of it . . .
  – Jenny Keating

Give Me Your Imperfections
  – Wendy Connor

Children of the One God
  – Bruce Felknor

As the Poet Says
  – Steve Klein

Happy Endings
  – Jenny Keating

Thoughts on Furniture
  – Billy Goodrum

Going Home
  – Juniper Lesnik

A Tale of Two Connections
  – Bruce Felknor

The Flowering Seed
  – Wendy Connor

Baby Steps
  – Steve Klein

Patience
  – Jenny Keating

Hold On!
  – Juniper Lesnik

Waiting for the New Humanity
  – Billy Goodrum

Remembering
  – Bruce Felknor

The Beloved's Beloved
  – Wendy Connor

Compare and Contrast
  – Steve Klein

It's in the struggle . . .
  – Jenny Keating

Time
  – Juniper Lesnik

The Tipping Point
  – Billy Goodrum

Learning Poise
  – Bruce Felknor

When "Good Enough" Isn't
  – Steve Klein

Conflict and Joy
  – Jenny Keating

Sleepless in San Jose
  – Juniper Lesnik

Vacation Incarnation
  – Steve Klein

Nerve Endings of the Soul
  – Jenny Keating

"Let the World Wait"
  – Wendy Connor

Religion vs Spirituality
  – Steve Klein

The Bigger Challenge
  – Wendy Connor

Que Sera Sera
  – Steve Klein

To Be Honest
  – Juniper Lesnik

Praise and Blame
  – Steve Klein

Being Right
  – Steve Klein

To Love God is To Love Our Fellow Beings
  – Juniper Lesnik

God is Alive in the World
  – Wendy Connor

Determined to Be His
  – Steve Klein

The Stuff We're Made Of
  – Juniper Lesnik

"I Will Always Be With You": Memories of the East West Gathering
  – Wendy Connor

Half Full or Half Empty?
  – Steve Klein

Love The One You're With
  – Steve Klein

Ordinary Life
  – Juniper Lesnik

Baba Loved Us Too
  – Wendy Connor

Feeling His Love
  – Steve Klein

He is both Father and Mother
  – Juniper Lesnik

A Leap of Faith
  – Wendy Connor

Becoming His
  – Steve Klein

Don't Worry, Be Happy
  – Juniper Lesnik

A Life Worth Living
  – Wendy Connor

Love The One You're With
  – Steve Klein

What a Mighty Beloved our Beloved is
  – Wendy Connor

To thine own self be true?
  – Steve Klein

The Sweets of His Love
  – Wendy Connor

Sickness and Health
  – Juniper Lesnik

Giving Advice
  – Steve Klein

"Garlic-Faced"
  – Wendy Connor

To Love and Be Loved
  – Juniper Lesnik

Talking About The Truth
  – Steve Klein

The Script was Written Long Ago
  – Wendy Connor

Excuse Me, Which Way to God?
  – Steve Klein

Letting Go
  – Juniper Lesnik

The Mosquitoes are Bad Today
  – Wendy Connor

What If A Teaching Moment Never Comes?
  – Steve Klein

Beads On One String
  – Juniper Lesnik

Youth Sahavas '07
  – Wendy Connor

Stop, You're Both Right!
  – Steve Klein

God, Please Give me a Job
  – Juniper Lesnik

"It Just Passes More Quickly"
  – Wendy Connor

Multiple Meher Babas
  – Steve Klein

Winking Back
  – Juniper Lesnik

The Treasure Within
  – Wendy Connor

Holding On, But Losing One's Grip
  – Steve Klein

1969
  – Ann Conlon

Obedience
  – Ann Conlon

Meher Center – The Way It Was
  – Ann Conlon

Armageddon, Anyone?
  – Ann Conlon

What Does Baba Want Me to Do?
  – Ann Conlon

Baba's 'Things'
  – Ann Conlon

What Does THAT Mean?
  – Ann Conlon

The Way It Was – Meherabad
  – Ann Conlon

Doing "Baba Work"
  – Ann Conlon

Broken Heads
  – Ann Conlon

Enid
  – Ann Conlon

On Being Ill
  – Ann Conlon

Meherjee
  – Ann Conlon

To Each His Own
  – Ann Conlon

Youth Sahavas
  – Ann Conlon

Kitty
  – Ann Conlon

The Lonely Path
  – Ann Conlon

Isn't He Enough?
  – Ann Conlon

He Said What?
  – Ann Conlon

Goher
  – Ann Conlon

Taking a Dare
  – Ann Conlon

Seeking Suffering
  – Ann Conlon

Amartithi
  – Ann Conlon

Dreams
  – Ann Conlon

Margaret
  – Ann Conlon

"The Disciple"
  – Ann Conlon

I Wonder ...
  – Ann Conlon

Backbiting, etc.
  – Ann Conlon

Hearing His Name
  – Ann Conlon

Rites, Rituals and Ceremonies
  – Ann Conlon

His Promise
  – Ann Conlon

"Baba's Group"
  – Ann Conlon

Then and Now
  – Ann Conlon

Middlemen Revisited
  – Ann Conlon

Padri
  – Ann Conlon

Gateway Days
  – Ann Conlon

The New Life
  – Ann Conlon

Books, Books and More Books
  – Ann Conlon

Elizabeth Patterson
  – Ann Conlon

His "Last Warning"
  – Ann Conlon

Is That A Religion Coming?
  – Ann Conlon

Detachment
  – Ann Conlon

A Country of Our Own?
  – Ann Conlon

Manifestation: Did He Or Didn't He?
  – Ann Conlon

Remembering Mohammed
  – Ann Conlon

Advice (Sort-Of) for Newcomers
  – Ann Conlon

You're a Baba Lover If...
  – Ann Conlon

Real Happiness
  – Ann Conlon

Baba Lover, Baba Follower or Both?
  – Ann Conlon

Meherazad – The Way It Was
  – Ann Conlon

The Strongest Memories
  – Ann Conlon

All (Baba) Things Considered

"It Just Passes More Quickly"

In recent months, we have seen several dear friends in the Baba community pass away. Feeling their loss, and seeing the continuous pictures of war so prevalent on the television each day, my thoughts have turned more and more to the spiritual meaning Baba gives to suffering and death.

In some ways, I find death easier to accept, as I grow older. Even in my sadness and attachment, I take some comfort in knowing the person has been released from their suffering. The main reason for this change in awareness in me is that I have been privileged to be in the room with a few close ones at the moment of their passing. Those experiences have had a tremendous impact on my understanding and acceptance of death.

One of my most precious memories is being with Kitty Davy the night she went to Baba. I was sitting by her side on a low stool by the bed, holding her hand, repeating Baba's name aloud. Her eyes were closed and I thought she had slipped into a coma. A little while later, to my astonishment, Kitty began repeating aloud, in a very clear voice, "Abba, Abba, Abba, Abba." I continued saying Baba's name and we began taking turns. She would say "Abba", and I would follow with, "Baba." Soon I realized Kitty was taking the lead, not me. This went on for a while, back and forth. Suddenly, there was a change in the rhythm and Kitty began repeating "Abba" so rapidly, that I could no longer keep up. Suddenly, she stopped and there was a profound silence. Her eyes opened wide, then closed on a big sigh and her hand released in mine.

Baba's presence was so powerful that I, as "Wendy", completely disappeared. It was just Kitty and Baba. Kitty was so clearly letting go of her form, reaching out to her Beloved, and Baba was so clearly waiting for her with such happiness.

Six years would pass before I realized in giving me that experience, Baba prepared me for my mother's passing. That's another beautiful story, for another time.

There's a wonderful account in Kitty's book, Love Alone Prevails, of an occasion when Baba spontaneously spoke to them about the illusion of death. In an excerpt from her diary, Kitty writes:

"One afternoon, several close ones were sitting with Baba on Meherabad Hill when a cable arrived from Margaret in England informing them that Mable Ryan had passed on. (Mabel was Margaret's partner in their dancing school.) A sadness fell over the group and Baba asked, "Why are you sad? Mabel has come to Me. She is still here, where else can she go? Only you do not see her, for being without her coat and hat on, you do not recognize her."

In a letter to Delia, Baba said: "I know how you feel parting with dear Mabel, but Mabel has not parted from you. She is closer to you now that she was or could be before. Love knows no separation and because you loved her so much, nothing, even death as physical separation is called, can break that tie of love there is between you."

Baba tells us one of the essential conditions of true happiness is complete detachment from desires and attachments. But, for most of us, both are ever present in one form or another. Whether it be one's attachment to a parent or child, a spouse, devoted friend, a special talent, food, our home, worry, being right and, particularly addictive, power; all are equally binding.

Intellectually, I know the only answer is letting go by consciously making the effort to remember Baba and surrender it to him. However, even with my inner conviction that Baba's Truth is the only Reality, it is no easy task. And of course, it's not meant to be.

During many visits with the mandali, I could see their detachment in action. They gave and continue to give so much love to thousands of pilgrims, able to do it only because of their love for Beloved Baba and, as Baba would often remind them, His love for them.

I know Baba severely tested His close ones; as Kitty would say, "Suffering was Baba's way of working." But it was rare to catch a glimpse of their personal feelings and it always took me by surprise when I was given such a glimpse.

On one such occasion, I was sitting with Mani in her office at the trust compound, when word came about a particular problem involving a member of Mani's family. It was clearly not good news. I saw an expression of deep sadness come in to Mani's eyes. She looked up at me and held my glance. I felt such pain in that moment that I caught my breath. In the next moment, I watched Mani gather herself and let go of whatever it was. Her wonderful smile returned and we went back to our conversation as if nothing had happened.

I can only strive for that kind of detachment and hope, that in some lifetime perhaps, I will be able to surrender everything to Him.

Another example that comes to mind involves Kitty, who would find herself worn out at the end of the day by the constant flow of people wanting to see her. One evening, after a particularly hectic day, Kitty came onto the back porch of Dilruba and sank in her chair with a weary sigh. Buz and I spontaneously asked her if the suffering ever ended. Kitty thought for a moment and replied, "No, I can't say that it does. It just passes more quickly." And with that, she gave a little laugh, and in her usual light hearted way talked about her day.